May 23, 2015

7 Reasons Why Every Church Leader Should Consider Periscope, the New Social Tool

It’s only been eleven days since I heard about Periscope from one of Auxano’s newest navigators, Chris Rivers. We were doing a leadership training event at Elmbrook Church with 500 leaders discussing their new mission and values. In seconds,  Chris started live streaming the event and over 40 people joined in. Since then, I have broadcast 11 live events, averaging one per day. Yesterday, anyone could have watched 15 minutes of Auxano’s virtual team training. Last night anyone could have chatted with me about book writing, while I hosted a 15 minutes Q&A at 11 o’clock at night trying to stay awake for another few hours. (I have 14 days left to finish God Dreams, my fourth book.)

What is Periscope? It’a an insanely simple, live streaming tool that connects with your twitter account. (Twitter bought it for $100 million.) Whatever you live stream, people can comment on, and “heart” showing realtime interaction and engagement. Best of all, it archives your live streaming event for 24 hours so that you followers can watch later if they weren’t available.   Read more at Wired or TechCrunch.

So why should every church leader jump on the band wagon?

Let me say up front that I am not a tech guy and I don’t really pay close attention to all of the new stuff that comes out. I am an opportunistic guy, who sees patterns fast and far.  What periscope will become is actually mind numbing when you consider the possibilities.  I won’t unpack it in this post.

But I do want to urge you to get on this tool and start experimenting.  Here are at least seven reason why every church leader should consider periscope, the new social media tool. 

GENERAL LEADERSHIP REASONS

 #1 Every new social tool is a new opportunity to learn as a leader.

I know you are busy and you can’t get distracted by everything. But the benefits of this opportunity are huge. If you keep the perspective of periscope as a leadership tool and a learning tool it will help. Think of is this way— It’s more efficient and probably more fun that reading another leadership book.

#2 Your influence may dramatically increase if you are an early adopter with a tool that will be widespread.

You want to be in the know when the odometer turns and everyone is reset to zero. That’s right, everyone is at the starting line. And the first ones to use it will begin to have differentiated influence. And every day you wait, you get further behind.

 #3 Periscope doesn’t start from scratch, but leverages your current twitter following. 

Fortunately you are not turning a giant flywheel with no momentum, unless of course you are not on twitter. For many of you, jumping into periscope will enable you to connect with dozens of people due to its integration with twitter. Yup, more stuff to retweet!

MINISTRY SPECIFIC REASONS

The most important factors, of course, have to do with the gospel and your ministry calling.

#4 Periscope removes the greatest barrier to discipleship—opportunities for life modeling that don’t require physical presence.

You can teach what you know, but you reproduce what you are. Periscope is an amazing tool for life modeling. Think about it. You might teach or preach to a crowd once a week. But who gets to see you do family devotions? Who might want to peek in for 5 minutes to see where you have your God times? What’s better than seeing the mission trip live from a handful of people on the ground?

What did Jesus due when he came to earth? He modeled his life so that he could start a life-modeling chain reaction. When he left he provided his personal presence through the Holy Spirit. He distributed his presence through the incredible nature of the Trinity himself. In some ways that is the same multipliable opportunity with Periscope. Periscope has been called “consensual voyeurism.” I would encourage you to think about it as “ever-present modeling multiplication”

#5 Periscope expands how a mobile society can stay connected to your ministry events.

My first post in 2015 became popular as I discussed why you most committed people will attend church less frequently. Here is a tool to address that challenge. Why wouldn’t you want to have a distributed workforce of people showing your ministry events, shared experiences and God moments as a church? I can’t wait to see the applications for church communicators!

 #6 Periscope creates a new horizon of innovation opportunity for the almost 8 billion in the world. 

The mind blowing begins when you think of the modeling, teaching and training opportunities leveraged across a growing global population of digitally connected people.  If you want some fuel to throw on your imagination, consider reading this post on 8 Predictions for the world in 2025.

Do you ever get tired of the church lagging far behind the innovation curve? Again, here is an new opportunity to leap ahead.

#7 There will be tons of distracting and even evil stuff on Periscope, so let’s saturate it with the gospel! 

Enough said.

Are you on Periscope yet? I would love to hear your thoughts.

Oh and be sure to connect with me @willmancini. Periscope up!

April 3, 2015

5 Biblical Principles for Personal Visioning

Younique
Two new initiatives have marked my ministry in 2015 and have me spending more time on personal visioning.

The first is leading my first personal vision cohort. Fourteen people have joined with me for a 12-month journey of finding and aligning their personal vision. It continues to be a great joy, and you will see a lot of new content on my blog toward the end of 2015 under the banner of “younique.”   Younique will be a brand for training and tools for personal visioning like nothing else currently available.

Another initiative is writing the official trade book follow-up to Church Unique— the book is called God Dreams: 12 Vision Templates for Finding and Focusing Your Church’s Future. Both of these books have me digesting content about visioning and dreaming.

Today I wanted to pass on five biblical principles for discerning your personal vision from Chip Ingram. These come right out of his chapter from Good to Great In God’s Eyes: 10 Practices Great Christians have in Common.  He calls it “Sanctified Dreaming” which I really appreciate. Chip does a great job of anchoring his insights in Scripture and is sensitive to the problem of chasing dreams for self-fulfillment rather than God’s glory.

Here are his principles for dreaming God-sized dreams, each taken from the life of a biblical character. 

#1  God commands us to step out of our comfort zone (ABRAHAM)

#2  God puts his dream in your heart (JOSEPH) I like his emphasis on God’s dream not ours.

#3  God allows us to fail in our attempts to accomplish his dream in our own power. (MOSES)

#4  God teaches us through adversity to love the dream giver more than the dream. (DAVID)

#5  God clarifies our calling in times of crisis and often uses our worst failures as the platform for his future fulfillment. (PAUL)

I particularly like the last principle. Scarcity breeds clarity. And I am always amazed how God uses our failures to bring his fulfillment, which has reflected my own life story.

March 27, 2015

Powerful Quotes on Vision and Leadership by Lyle Schaller, Church Consultant #LyleLearnings

Will Mancini tribute to Lyle SchallerLyle Schaller, a church consultant who passed away last week, was the most well-known and most-traveled church consultants of the 20th century.  He was a master of understanding church vision and leadership. He wrote or cowrote over 94 books, and brought a prolific diagnostic ability to his work. I cannot express my gratitude enough for his life model and the rich learning that he passed on; especially helping guys like me practice in the arena of church consulting.

To celebrate his legacy, the Auxano team is inviting church leaders and church consultants everywhere to join in a simple social media tribute today. Share powerful quotes or insights or just shout out that he visited your church.

Use the hashtag #LyleLearnings.

QUOTES THAT MOVE ME AND MAKE ME FROM LYLE SCHALLER

On Vision

  • The safe assumption today is that no two churches are alike; each congreation has its own unique culture.
  • One of the most widely neglected facets of new church development is the value of a distinctive identity for every new mission.
  • The key variables in new church development are not location, location, and location, but visionary leadership, entrepreneurial leadership, and long-tenured leadership.
  • Church leaders operate in a longer time frame than most realize. What you do this week will not be significant for three to four years.
  • A vision for a new tomorrow usually is based on a high degree of discontinuity with the past.
  • Planned change always begins with discontent with the status quo.
  • The most serious shortage in our society is for skilled transformational leaders who possess the capability to initiate planned change from within an organization.

On Diagnosis (Lyle’s Learning and Listening Approach)

  • Too many congregations try to establish a ministry plan out of thin air.
  • Change is the name of the game, and questions are the heart of that game.
  • You can’t really effectively provide fully informed decisions on any kind of action or strategy, such as a ministry plan for a congregation, unless you first have a diagnosis.
  • One of the most important dimensions of a change agent’s job may be to foster creativity by asking questions rather than by suggesting answers.
  • It is appropriate, productive, and good for congregational leaders periodically to engage themselves in the process of appraising the role, ministry, internal dynamics, outreach, and life of that congregation.
  • The small congregation is to the megachurch what the village is to the large central city. They are different orders of God’s creation.

On Volunteers

  • Make a distinction between hiring staff to do ministry and choosing staff who focus on challenging, motivating, enlisting, training, placing, nurturing, and supporting volunteers.
  • In well over 95 percent of all American Protestant congregations, the driving force in assigning volunteers is to fill vacant slots. In the other 3 or 4 or 5 percent the number-one criterion is, ‘Will accepting this volunteer role enhance the spiritual and personal growth of this individual?’
  • Do not expect long-established groups to attract new members!

What would you add and what have you learned? Please share if you have had any exposure too or experience with Lyle Schaller as a church consultant. Remember to use #LyleLearnings

For more on Lyle Schaller’s life,  my friends at Learning Network wrote this tribute. Here is an article from Christianity Today.

March 19, 2015

Incredible Coaching Opportunity for Pastors in Southern California: Vision co::Lab with Senior Pastor Rich Kannwischer

How would you like to get 24 hours of vision, strategy and missional leadership coaching from one of the most effective pastors in the country? Rich Kannwischer, Senior Pastor of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church in Newport Beach, CA, will be leading a Vision co::Lab at his church from April – November. I am particularly excited about this opportunity to learn from Rich. 

Shortly after Rich assumed the pastorate at St. Andrew’s, I reflected on a dynamic interplay I observed in his leadership, between two different kinds of “wins.”

Some things that a new pastor does naturally relate to felt needs of the church. Other things are more significant changes that will eventually shape the church’s culture. Both are real wins but how they happen and how they feel are very different. Great leaders use them together to maximize positive change.

For example, not long into his assignment, Rich changed both the service times and the worship strategy. (There had been no change for 30 years.)  In the first 7 weeks after the change, the new strategy, coupled with his energy and preaching talent realized a 30% increase in weekend attendance. This dramatic change met a huge felt need (given the congregation’s mildly declining attendance) by providing hope for their future.

But Rich took on two other projects in the short term.  First, he refused to move into the generous square footage of the previous pastor’s office, in favor of creating a more efficient, inviting and collaborative space. Second, he partnered with Auxano to navigate a team down the Vision Pathway. Even though the team had completed some strong strategic planning work, the language was not robust or specific enough to shape culture. Both of these initiatives required extra effort because they were completely off the felt need radar. 

Clearly, Rich is leveraging wins that meet felt needs for wins that guide a new future.

  • How are you balancing felt-need wins with culture-shaping wins?
  • Are you looking for and creating both kinds?
  • Are you trying to do too many culture-shaping wins at the expense of felt needs?
  • Are you only focusing on only felt needs, neglecting to challenge the status quo?

As you review these questions consider the differences:

> Wins that meet felt needs DO

  • Bring immediate satisfaction to individuals
  • Build immediate credibility for the leader (more chips in the bank)
  • Create a positive atmosphere

 DO NOT

  • Change the expectations of people
  • Automatically align with the vision
  • Reflect the most pressing real needs

> Wins that shape culture DO

  • Introduce a new way of thinking
  • Align people, tools, and process toward a clear vision
  • Create long term value

 DO NOT

  • Feel good at first
  • Build credibility immediately
  • Happen without dialogue and pushback

Rich will be bringing the same wisdom and balance displayed above to the Vision co::Lab.

Our co::Labs are co:ntinuous and co:laborative communities where 8 churches come together (4 people per church) to walk the Vision Pathway. We meet six times, one time per month, for four hours of training on topics like:

            Reading the culture of your community

            Assessing your congregation’s strengths

            Rallying people to a common cause

            Shaping a church’s internal culture

            Leading a vision process

            Mentoring staff

            Releasing the church for community impact

            Radically simplifying the mechanics of church

Of course you will get the standard deliverables and toolkit that come with every Church Unique Vision co::Lab. And, I will be joining Rich for several sessions.

To learn more about this incredible coaching opportunity, click here to get the dates, cost and further details.

February 24, 2015

The Top 10 Ways Pastors Spend Time that Doesn’t Make Disciples

What gets in our way when it comes to the church’s mission to make disciples? Let’s look at the things we do at church and they way we spend our time as pastors:

  1. Preparing a sermon or teaching message in a given week without spending time in disciple-making relationships.
  2. Spending time meeting with staff and church leaders in a given week in lieu of spending time in personal disciple-making relationships.
  3. Designing a worship experience in a given week without a prior design of a clear disciple-making strategy.
  4. Managing a weekly money gathering process from people without having a clear disciple-making vision that will be used to steward the money.
  5. Recruiting people to volunteer in ministry environments without any knowledge of their involvement in disciple-making relationships.
  6. Providing for the care needs of others in the church without a system for care to take place in the context of disciple-making relationships.
  7. Creating any content (worship guides, newsletters, social media, curriculum) without a prior definition of disciple-making outcomes.
  8. Training any small group or Bible study leaders without a prior training in the church’s disciple-making strategy and outcomes.
  9. Developing and launching programs that do not fit into a clear and cohesive disciple-making strategy.
  10. Putting out fires with or for people who could care less whether they have or you have any disciple-making relationships in life. 

What would you add? What do you think pastors do that does not make disciples?  Help me write the next 10!